Beyond the Headlines had a great year in 2016! In this episode, Season 3 Executive Producers Samira Basir and Rajesh Sankat have a countdown with the top 5 shows of 2016. Below are the titles and descriptions of these shows. Take a listen to find out where your favourite show was in the countdown!

Barriers to Birth Control Access

Effective contraception methods are underutilized in Canada, as women face barriers when accessing reproductive health care. In this episode, we explore how this poses the problem that in an advanced nation such as Canada, women are still facing difficulties obtaining and using contraceptives. We discuss how financial, geographic, cultural and education barriers are preventing women from accessing adequate sexual and reproductive health information and services. Finally, we also explore potential policy solutions crucial to eliminating barriers to birth control access.

Canadian Implications of a Trump Presidency 

The world watched with baited breath for the outcomes of Tuesday’s U.S. election. With his protectionist rhetoric and trade-focused vision for the United States, Donald Trump was elected 45th president of the United States, winning the electoral college. Along with a Republican Congress and Senate, there is a level of uncertainty of what will happens next. How will these political actors and institutions affect us Canadians up north?

Police Accountability in the GTA – Part 2 

As the Toronto Police Services’ (TPS) budget increases, internal reforms to combat the organization’s disciplinary system and every-day operations have lagged.  Reports and internal reviews have also not enacted visible changes. Beyond the Headlines takes a look at this issue in a two part series.  This second episode features reporter Jesse McLean from Toronto Star’s investigative team and  Toronto-Centre Rosedale councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam.

Canadian Content in a Digital World: Assessing Policy Options

In April 2016, Canada’s Heritage Ministry launched a review to overhaul Canadian cultural policies for the first time in decades. The impetus? To bring Canada into the digital age. Public consultations with consumers and content creators intend to modernize Canada’s cultural properties, everything from the Broadcast Act to the Telecommunications Act to the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission. Canadian Heritage Minister Melanie Joly is willing to modify the mandate of the CBC and create new laws or agencies, if necessary. It’s the kind of overhaul that hasn’t been attempted in 25 years. If we accept the need for Canadian Content promotion, how should the government adjust regulations and funding models to account for digital consumption?

 

Basic Income Guarantee 

Basic income guarantee (BIG) policies have recently garnered focus and attention on the provincial, national, and international policy stage. For example, Ontario has announced a BIG pilot project, beginning as early as Fall 2016 and was recently formalized as an official policy of the Liberal Party of Canada. A BIG policy replaces numerous benefit programs (e.g., employment insurance, old age security) with a a direct cash transfer from the government to its citizens that is not predicated on labour market participation. The fundamental premise is that a BIG maintains income at a level high enough to satisfy basic needs, thus alleviating poverty and may improve population health outcomes. However, BIG policies also have also received a fair share of criticism. This week, we bring in three expert guests to break down this complex and controversial policy proposal.

Samira Basir & Rajesh Sankat, Executive Producer

Music Credits
Wild Things Instrumental by Alessia Cara
Don’t Touch My Hair x Cranes in the Sky (Solange Knowles Mashup) by Normani Kordei
Say It Right by Nelly Furtado

Flickr/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0